Posts Tagged ‘medically fragile kids’

Home for the Holidays

Friday, December 21st, 2012

phs, pediatric home service, thrive, homecare, holiday, christmas, new years eve, thankful,

It can be easy to get caught up in the festivities and excitement centered around this time of year. All of the countless errands, the parties, the cookies, and the presents to buy. But ultimately all of that leads to the most important part of the holiday season, spending time with your loved ones.

Thinking about our jobs here at Pediatric Home Service I am overcome with gratitude. I am grateful for the role we get to play in our families lives. Every single person in PHS from the warehouse, to the pharmacy, the administrative team, to the billers, play a role in safely getting medically-complex children out of the hospitals and at home with their family. This transition from hospital to home  is a miracle every time that it happens, but I believe the holidays give everyone around here that little extra boost of motivation to get kids home in time for the special day. There is nothing like having everyone at home celebrating and making lifelong memories.

We understand this transition can be scary and overwhelming for our families and we want to thank you for putting your trust in PHS to be a part of your extended family on this journey. We recognize how special it is to have your child at home with you. And we feel blessed to be a part of that. Enjoy your holidays and know that your child’s safety and comfort is our #1 goal and we are never more than a phone call away. 24 hours a day, 7 days a week.

I know I speak for everyone at PHS when I say Merry Christmas, Happy Holidays and a very blessed New Year to each and everyone of you.

Thanksgiving Meal Assistance Programs 2012

Friday, November 9th, 2012

We’re coming up on an especially needy time of year for many families, yet many metro Minnesota area organizations, churches, and food shelves ensure that every family can give thanks over a traditional Thanksgiving meal.

PHS Medical Social Worker, Monica Handlos has compiled a larger list than ever before. Look through the options below, and if you have further questions or our resources don’t cover your area, Monica recommends contacting the United Way First Call for Help at 651-291-0211. Ask them for agencies or food shelves that are helping with Thanksgiving Meals or Baskets.  They will ask for your zip code and give you a list of local agencies that might be able to help you out.

Holiday Meals:

  1. Kierans Irish Pub
    612.339.4499
    601 North 1st Avenue Minneapolis, MN 55403
    Free Thanksgiving meal call for reservation. Free clothing closet also available on Thanksgiving day.
  2. Cherokee Tavern
    886 Smith Ave S, West St. Paul, MN 55118
    Free Thanksgiving meal served. Meals available for pick-up as well.
    For tickets please call Neighbors, Inc 651.455.1508 before November 16th.
  3. Bierstube
    651.271.4961
    2670 E County Rd E, White Bear Lake, MN 55110 or 7121 10th St Oakdale, MN 55128.
    Free Thanksgiving meal provided to anyone in need.
  4. Pepitos Mexican Restaurant
    612.827.2928
    4820 Chicago Ave, Minneapolis, MN 55417
    Free Thanksgiving meal provided beginning at 10am- 3pm.
  5. Gethsemane Lutheran Church
    952.935.1753
    715 Minnetonka Mills Rd, Hopkins, MN 55343
    Free Thanksgiving meal beginning at 1pm in Gethsemane Lutheran Fellowship Hall.  Please make a reservation by November 23rd.
  6. Faith Lutheran Church of Coon Rapids
    763.354.7826
    11115 Hanson Blvd, NW, Coon Rapids, MN 55433
    Free Thanksgiving Meal.  Serves Anoka County.  Please call church for details.
  7. Marie Sandvik Center
    763.354.7826
    1112 E Franklin Ave. Minneapolis, MN 55404
    Free Thanksgiving Meal.  Serves city of Minneapolis. Call for more details.
  8. Sharing and Caring Hands
    612.338.4640
    525 N 7th St. Minneapolis, MN 55405
    Free Thanksgiving Meal 10 am-12 pm.  Serves Anoka, Carver, Dakota, Hennepin, Ramsey, Scott and Washington Counties. Call for more details.
  9. Union Gospel Mission
    612.292.1721
    435 University Ave E. St. Paul, MN 55103
    Free Thanksgiving Meal.  Serves low income families, no reservations needed. Call for more details.
  10. Thanksgiving Meals on Wheels (no affiliation with Meals on Wheels)
    651.699.5404
    They deliver Thanksgiving meals to families living within 45 miles of St. Paul.  Call between 8:30-4pm to set up a delivery.  They will need your address, zip code, and number of people who will be eating on Thanksgiving.  Meals will be delivered between 8-11am on Thanksgiving and someone needs to be at home in order to sign for the delivery.  The meal includes a roasted turkey and dressing (already cooked) along with raw potatoes, canned vegetables, canned cranberries, rolls, butter, milk, and pie for dessert.

Food Baskets:

  1. Christian Cupboard
    651.738.2338
    7380 Afton Road, Woodbury, MN 55125
    Need to register in person on before November 15. Bring id and proof of address such as a current utility bill.  Children will also need a proof of ID such as a medical or social security card.
    Area served includes, Woodbury, Maplewood south of I-94, Landfall, Oakdale.
  2. Volunteers Enlisted to Assist People (VEAP)
    952.888.9616
    Food certificate or bag of groceries for those in need.
    Bring photo ID, proof of address such as a current utility bill.  Children will also need a proof of ID such as a medical or social security card.
    Area served includes, Bloomington, Edina, Richfield, and South Minneapolis.
  3. North Suburban Emergency Assistance Response (NEAR)
    763.533.2836
    4803 Welcome Ave N, Crystal, MN 55429
    Thanksgiving Baskets available to NEAR clients. To register for the NEAR program call Tuesday or Thursday after 9 am and speak with Phyllis.
    Service area: New Hope, Crystal, Robbinsdale between 42nd Ave N and 62nd Ave N.

John’s Troubleshooting Tip of the Month: Food Pump Series- Part 5 Gravity Bag Feeding

Monday, March 5th, 2012

PHS understands how stressful it can be when a piece of equipment isn’t working properly, and we want to help resolve any issues as soon as possible for you. So, once a month, PHS Respiratory Therapist, John Sheahan posts a tip on how to troubleshoot a common error with a piece of equipment.

This month we will finish up our food pump series by troubleshooting gravity bags.

A gravity bag does not need a pump to deliver formula or breast milk. It is used short term if, after troubleshooting with a PHS clinician, it has been determined that the food pump needs to come in for service. This allows you to feed your child/patient while your replacement pump is being delivered. To make sure you give the right amount of formula or breast milk you must use a simple calculation.

  • Enter the rate on your food pump into the ___(blank line)___
  • Multiply that number by 20
  • Divide that number by 60 to give you the number of drips per minute to set using the gravity bag.
    • For example if you have a set rate on the food pump of 35 mL**/hr it would look like this:
    • 30 x 20 = 600
    • 600 divided by 60 = 10 drips per minute.
    • **NOTE: If the number is not a whole number round either up or down to the closest whole number.

    Once you have figured out the Calculation for Gravity Drip follow these instructions to deliver the right amount of formula or breast milk:

    1. Clean workspace and gather supplies.
    2. Wash hands well.
    3. If formula is in concentrate or ready to feed form, shake can well.
    4. Wipe off top of can with clean cloth.
    5. Close roller clamp on feeding bag.
    6. Pour formula or breast milk into bag. Close top firmly.
    7. Hang feeding bag high enough to allow tube feeding to flow by gravity.
    8. Open roller clamp to fill tubing.
    9. Close roller clamp. The drip chamber must be half full.
    10. Flush feeding tube with warm water.
    11. Have your child sit comfortably in upright position during the feeding.
    12. Open the roller clamp on the tubing. Use the clamp to adjust the flow rate. Speed up the flow by opening the clamp, or slow down the flow by closing it. If your child has diarrhea or abdominal discomfort, slow down the flow rate.
    13. After feeding is complete, close all the clamps.
    14. Disconnect tubing from the feeding tube and flush with warm water.

    John Sheahan, RRT-NPS, LRTJohn Sheahan, RRT-NPS, LRT is a Licensed Respiratory Therapist at PHS and would love to hear from you if you have a tip that you’ve found helps when working with your equipment, or have an idea for a Troubleshooting Tip post. Share your tip or idea through a comment here or an email to John at jcsheahan@pediatrichomeservice.com.

PHS celebrates Feeding Tube Awareness Week, February 5-11

Monday, February 6th, 2012

tube feeding awareness, infusion, feeding pump, infinity teal, infinity orange, g tube, jtube, formulaTube feeding’ is a term that at times may cast a negative light upon an already complex medical situation.  However, what is not commonly known are the benefits a tube feeding can provide a growing child.  By providing nutrition through the use of a feeding tube, a child that may not be able to obtain adequate or any nutrition by mouth would still be able to grow, thrive, and develop.

PHS is excited to be celebrating this awareness week and wanted to share with you some resources that our Dietitians pulled together. The links below have information for adults and kids alike. Do you know of any other resources? We’d love for you to leave us a comment here to keep growing our list of resources.

Resources & Fun Sites for Families:

Happy One Year to our PDNS department

Friday, February 3rd, 2012

Just over one year ago PHS launched our newest service, Private Duty Nursing (PDNS). We are excited to look back over the past year at all that has taken place since bringing our first PDNS patient home on January 18th, 2011. Allowing children the opportunity to thrive at home with their family while still receiving the highest quality and safest healthcare available to them is what makes us tick. Adding private duty nursing to our services has allowed PHS to complete the circle of homecare services for any medically-fragile, technology dependent child and their family.

One phone call can take care of so much. A parent can place a supply order, check on the last lab draw results, troubleshoot any concern with equipment or supplies and schedule the next IV nurse visit, all in one call. The same is true for the healthcare professionals that we partner with daily. One phone call to PHS and we will coordinate all services needed to get a child out of the hospital and to the comfort of their home. Including training the family and any caregivers on all equipment. All the while staying in constant communication with the physician to ensure the everyone always has the latest information.

Here are a few fun facts about the first year of Private Duty Nursing at PHS:

  • Number of field nurse assessments (PDNS Shift and PDNS Seizure)? 9,070!!
  • Number of Patients that have been on PDNS service? 37
  • Number of current field nurses? 110
  • Geographically; where is our furthest patient located? Brainerd
  • How many homes have 2 or more patients in the same home? 2

The picture shows our amazing internal PDNS staff that keep the ship moving, and although they are not pictured, the incredible 110 field nurses round out the PDNS department.  It truly takes a team to take care of the child and we happen to think we’ve come up with a winning team.

We want to take a moment to thank each family that has invited PHS staff into your home and allowed us the opportunity to care for your child. Each one is a blessing and we love partnering with you to keep your children safe, happy and healthy at home- just where they belong.

Lila’s Story Part I: Over 13 weeks of bedrest and an uncertain future

Thursday, December 29th, 2011

We have a special treat in store for our readers over the next week. PHS mom, Aimee Tjader, has graciously offered to share her story. The story of her pregnancy, birth and coming home from the hospital with their new bundle of joy, Lila.  Today, Aimee recalls the uncertainty she and her husband felt after an unexpected complication at only 18 weeks gestation.  In the coming week we will be posting Aimee’s story in three parts. We will post part two tomorrow and the third the following Friday. Grab your box of tissues and read on as Aimee tells their story.

___________________________

No parent can imagine their newborn baby hooked up to tubes and wires, fighting for their lives under a clear glass isolette in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU). But for some families, the NICU is the best case scenario. It’s for those parents that the NICU is the “house of hope.”

At 18 weeks gestation, I suffered preterm Premature Rupture of Membranes (pPROM). In lamens terms, my water broke much too soon and the outlook was grim. Being my first pregnancy, I was clueless about such a condition. My heart sunk deep into my chest that day when the doctor confirmed I’d lost all of the amniotic fluid providing the protective pool around my baby. “What does this mean? Can’t something be done?”

Nothing could be done. I was told I would likely go into labor within a few days, or I could be admitted to the hospital right then and there to “take care of the situation” that night. I would have to deliver the baby, who obviously would not survive at 18 weeks. Or, in the slight chance that I stayed pregnant long enough the baby would likely have severely underdeveloped lungs (baby’s drink amniotic fluid to grow their lungs), deformities and other lifelong problems.

Trying to soak in this whirlwind of new information, I asked to be admitted for a round of IV antibiotics to ward off any potential infection brewing and for a Level III ultrasound by a high-risk doctor the next morning. I hoped and prayed that night, my first-ever night spent in a hospital, that the amniotic sac would heal and everything would be OK. In my dreams I would leave the hospital, still carrying my child, and get back to life as I knew it before I learned what pPROM was. I envisioned going back to work, growing a big round belly, having a baby shower and perusing the baby section of Target along with all the pregnant women. I’d stand proudly beside my pregnant best friend comparing our bellies for a photo op. And I’d create the perfect nursery with the baby’s name in giant script above the crib. But I never got to do any of that.

After one day in the hospital, I went home and under the advice of my doctors, got into bed and stayed there. We had a plan: I would complete six weeks of strict bedrest at home and once I reached 24 weeks gestation — viability — I would be admitted to the hospital until I delivered the baby.

The days dragged on. And on. Of course I was filled with fear that I would go into labor and everything would come crashing down in an instant, but I laid still in bed only getting up to use the bathroom and take quick showers. Friends, family and co-workers brought groceries and prepared meals, walked the dogs and cleaned the house. The support around us was incredible — it felt like all of Minnesota and every corner of the U.S. was pulling for our happy ending.

At 24 weeks, incredibly still pregnant, I was admitted to the hospital. With every intention of being there for the long haul, I brought the comforts of home: my own bedding, a rug, pictures, even a bedside lamp for cozy reading. I quickly got to know all of the antepartum nurses and all of the perinatologists. I sensed the sorrow in their voices and read the pessimism on their faces when I asked them about my outlook and the chance for a healthy baby. Every day they would check on me growing increasingly surprised that I was still there, my belly getting bigger with each week. I was hooked up to the fetal heart rate monitor twice-a-day and I received weekly ultrasounds, always showing a disappointing “unmeasurable” amount of amniotic fluid.

But I never gave up hope. I took vitamins, drank enough water to fill Lake Superior in hopes of creating more amniotic fluid, and did acupuncture, guided imagery and breathing techniques to keep me in a place of calm so that I could be the healthiest vessel for my baby. I was allowed to go for one wheel-chair ride a day outside, which I often took advantage of to savor Minnesota’s warm summer sun.

After celebrating making it to 31 weeks of pregnancy and seven weeks of hospital bedrest, I began to have contractions. They grew closer together, the baby had an elevated heart rate and I had a fever. The doctor called, feared an infection and said it was time. We would be having a baby that night and she would be here nine weeks too early.

A quick ultrasound revealed the baby still in breech position, so I signed some papers and was wheeled off to the operating room. The room was bright, like in a dream, and freezing cold. My teeth chattered as they inserted the spinal and draped a blue cloth over my belly. A dozen doctors and nurses were on hand for the delivery, plus another handful waiting for our baby in the next room, including neonatologists and respiratory therapists. It was a scene straight out of some thrilling medical TV drama.

At 3:59 a.m. on Sept. 14, 2010, Lila Kalét Tjader arrived weighing 3 lbs. 14 oz. She didn’t cry, but she was beautiful. Tears welled up in my eyes as she was taken out of my sight. I crossed my fingers and repeated under my breath, over and over, “Breathe, baby, breathe.”

Thanksgiving meal assistance in metro MN

Friday, November 4th, 2011

thanksgiving meal assiantce, food shelf, food shelves, food basket, free thanksgiving dinner, turkey dinnerWe’re coming up on an especially needy time of year for families, yet many metro Minnesota area organizations, churches, and food shelves ensure that every family can give thanks over a traditional Thanksgiving meal.

Last year PHS had a list of 5 food shelves that families could contact for assistance, this year PHS’s Medical Social Worker, Monica Handlos has found even more resources to help families in need for the holiday season. Monica recommends contacting the United Way First Call for Help at 651-291-0211 if the list below doesn’t cover your area. Ask them for agencies or food shelves that are helping with Thanksgiving Meals or Baskets.  They will ask for your zip code and give you a list of local agencies that might be able to help you out.

Review these options and see which ones make the most sense for you.

Most meals include a roasted turkey and dressing (already cooked) along with raw potatoes for you to cook, canned vegetables, canned cranberries, rolls, butter, milk and pie.

Holiday Meals:

  1. Thanksgiving Meals on Wheels
    651.699.5404
    They deliver Thanksgiving meals to families living within 45 miles of St. Paul.  Call between 8:30-4pm to set up a delivery.  They will need your address, zip code, and number of people who will be eating on Thanksgiving.  Meals will be delivered between 8-11am on Thanksgiving and someone needs to be at home in order to sign for the delivery.  The meal includes a roasted turkey and dressing (already cooked) along with raw potatoes, canned vegetables, canned cranberries, rolls, butter, milk, and pie for dessert.
  2. Cherokee Tavern
    886 Smith Ave S, West St. Paul, MN 55118
    Free Thanksgiving meal served at Noon and 1:30pm.
    Transportation is available to those in need and meals may be delivered if needed.  For tickets please call Neighbors, Inc 651.455.1508; St. Francis de Sales 651.228.1169, Neighborhood House 651.789.2564-Spanish or 651.789.2541-Hmong
  3. Bierstube
    651.773.5854
    2670 E County Rd E, White Bear Lake, MN 55110 or 7121 10th St Oakdale, MN 55128.
    Free Thanksgiving meal provided to anyone in need between 12-2:30pm.
  4. Pepitos Mexican Restaurant
    612.827.2928
    4820 Chicago Ave, Minneapolis, MN 55417
    Free Thanksgiving meal provided beginning at 10am.
  5. Gethsemane Lutheran Church
    952.935.1753
    715 Minnetonka Mills Rd, Hopkins, MN 55343
    Free Thanksgiving meal beginning at 1pm in Gethsemane Lutheran Fellowship Hall.  Please make a reservation by November 23rd.
  6. Faith Lutheran Church of Coon Rapids
    763.354.7826
    11115 Hanson Blvd, NW, Coon Rapids, MN 55433
    Free Thanksgiving Meal.  Serves Anoka County.  Please call church for details.

Food Baskets:

  1. Christian Cupboard
    651.738.2338
    7380 Afton Road, Woodbury, MN 55125
    Need to register in person on November 15th between 9-Noon.  Bring id and proof of address such as a current utility bill.  Children will also need a proof of ID such as a medical or social security card.
    Area served includes, Woodbury, Maplewood south of I-94, Landfall, Oakdale.
  2. Family Pathways
    651.464.2098
    935 Lake St. S, Forest Lake, MN 55025
    Holiday meal supplies are provided.  Please call for an appointment.  Will need to complete an application, show proof of address, and ID.  Service area: Forest Lake, Scandia, Wyoming, and surrounding area.
  3. North Suburban Emergency Assistance Response (NEAR)
    763.533.2836
    4803 Welcome Ave N, Crystal, MN 55429
    Thanksgiving Baskets available to those eligible.  Please call for an appointment Monday-Friday 9am-4:30pm.
    Service area: New Hope, Crystal, Robbinsdale between 42nd Ave N and 62nd Ave N.

John’s Troubleshooting Tip of the Month: Capnography Monitors (ETCO2) for nasal cannula

Wednesday, September 14th, 2011

Novametrix Capnogard ETCO2 Monitor

PHS understands how stressful it can be when a piece of equipment isn’t working properly, and we want to help resolve any issues as soon as possible for you. So, once a month, PHS Respiratory Therapist, John Sheahan will post a tip on how to troubleshoot a common error with a piece of equipment.

Last month I discussed using a capnograph or ETCO2 monitor, as they are sometimes called, to patients with tracheostomy tubes. This month I would like to talk about using a capnograph to patients without a tracheostomy tube, using a nasal cannula.

The Novametrix Capnogard ETCO2 Monitor is the only capnograph PHS carries that will measure exhaled carbon dioxide (ETCO2) levels using a nasal cannula. Be sure to use the step-by-step instructions at the end of this post to setup and calibrate the monitor before use.

Troubleshooting

If the exhaled carbon dioxide, or ETCO2, results seem inaccurate:

  1. Make sure the pump is on (there will be a small pump icon displayed in the lower part of the LED screen and the monitor will make a pumping noise).
  2. Make sure the patient cable is tight and not damaged.
  3. If you need to disconnect and reconnect the patient cable be sure to recalibrate the monitor.
  4. Check the Sample Airway Adapter for cracks or water spots.
  5. Check tubing and cannula for kinks.
  6. Check for excessive humidity in the Dehumidifier Tube – and change if necessary.
  7. Check nasal cannula prongs to make sure they are not clogged – clean or change if necessary.
  8. If these steps do not correct the problem call PHS.

Using ETCO2 monitor with a Nasal Cannula


  1. Make sure Sampling Airway Adapter windows are clean, dry and not cracked.
  2. Snap Sampling Airway Adapter to child’s cable.
  3. Connect sampling tubing from adapter to inlet port on the front of monitor.
  4. If instructed by your PHS Clinician, connect Dehumidifier Tube to Sampling Airway Adapter.
  5. Connect appropriate CO2 Nasal Cannula to Sampling Airway Adapter.
  6. Press POWER key to turn monitor ON.
  7. Make sure HIGH/LOW ETCO2 and HIGH/LOW RESPIRATORY RATE alarm parameters are correct.
  8. When Capnogard displays “ERASE STORED TRENDS?”, press YES to erase stored data. NOTE! If doing an overnight study, DO NOT erase the trends once study begins.
  9. Make sure sampling pump is turned ON. NOTE! A pump icon displays on screen. If you do not see this pump icon, do the following:
    1. Press MENU.
    2. Press PUMP.
    3. Press ON.

    1. If needed, calibrate the sensor as instructed. Calibrate if sampling method has changed or “ADAPTER CAL?” appears on display. Read the Calibrating the Sensor section below.
    2. Place appropriate CO2 Nasal Cannula on child.
    3. Watch your child’s respiratory rate and ETCO2 value. Record these values in the child’s chart or on the log sheet provided.

    Calibrating the Sensor

    1. Press CAL key. The message “PLACE ON ADAPTER IN ROOM AIR” displays.
    2. Place sensor and adapter away from all CO2 sources.
    3. Press START key. The “TIME REMAINING” number counts down and main menu displays.
    4. At the end of countdown, remove Patient Airway Adapter and place Capnostat on “0” rear cell. Wait for the countdown.
    5. When “PLACE REFERENCE CELL” message displays, move to (front) “REF” cell.
    6. When “CALIBRATION VERIFIED” displays, remove from reference cell and place Patient Airway Adapter on Capnostat.
    7. Press CAL key.
    8. Press START key. Wait for the countdown.

John Sheahan, RRT-NPS, LRTJohn Sheahan, RRT-NPS, LRT is a Licensed Respiratory Therapist at PHS and would love to hear from you if you have a tip that you’ve found helps when working with your equipment, or have an idea for a Troubleshooting Tip post. Share your tip or idea through a comment here or an email to John at jcsheahan@pediatrichomeservice.com.

John’s Troubleshooting Tip of the Month: Capnography Monitors (ETCO2)

Tuesday, August 2nd, 2011

PHS understands how stressful it can be when a piece of equipment isn’t working properly, and we want to help resolve any issues as soon as possible for you. So, once a month, PHS Respiratory Therapist, John Sheahan will post a tip on how to troubleshoot a common error with a piece of equipment.

Capnographs or ETCO2 monitors as they are sometimes called are extremely valuable machines for monitoring your patient or child’s carbon dioxide as they breathe. Of course with any machine there can be problems. This month I will focus on a few troubleshooting steps that will insure you always getting the most accurate readings when using a capnograph to trach.

Novametrix Capnogard ETCO2 Monitor

Novametrix Capnogard ETCO2 Monitor

When using the Novametrix Capnogard monitor be sure to always calibrate before use by following the step-by-step instructions below:

Calibrating the Sensor

  1. Press CAL key. The message “PLACE ON ADAPTER IN ROOM AIR” displays.
  2. Place sensor and adapter away from all CO2 sources.
  3. Press START key. The “TIME REMAINING” number counts down and main menu displays.
  4. At the end of countdown, remove Patient Airway Adapter and place Capnostat on “0” rear cell. Wait for the countdown.
  5. When “PLACE REFERENCE CELL” message displays, move to (front) “REF” cell.
  6. When “CALIBRATION VERIFIED” displays, remove from reference cell and place Patient Airway Adapter on Capnostat.
  7. Press CAL key.
  8. Press START key. Wait for the countdown.

Tidal Wave Novametrix Capnograph

TIDAL WAVE Novametrix Monitor

When using the TIDAL WAVE Novametrix monitor be sure to always zero before use by following the step-by-step instructions below:

Zeroing a new patient airway adapter

  1. Attach a new patient airway adapter to the TIDAL WAVE patient cable.
  2. Press POWER button to turn machine ON.
  3. Make sure light below NEO key is OFF.
  4. Wait for the sensor on the patient cable to warm up. NOTE! The text SENSOR WARMING displays on screen.
  5. Press and hold NEO key until the ZERO menu screen displays.
  6. Press the PAGE button to “zero” the adapter. NOTE! Pressing this button starts a process that allows the machine to read your child’s carbon dioxide levels accurately. This process is occurring when the machine’s screen shows a numerical countdown.
  7. When the zero process is complete, the machine automatically switches to monitoring mode.
  8. You can now use the machine as ordered by your child’s doctor.

Troubleshooting tips for your TIDAL WAVE monitor

If the carbon dioxide, or ETCO2, results seem inaccurate (for either monitor):

  • Make sure patient cable is tight and not damaged.
  • Check Patient Airway Adapter for cracks or water spots.
  • If you need to disconnect and reattach the patient cable (Novametrics Capnograph only) or change the Patient Airway Adapter recalibrate or Zero the machine.
  • If ETCO2 results are still low check for leak around the trach. This can give a false low reading.
  • If these steps do not correct the problem call PHS.

John Sheahan, RRT-NPS, LRTJohn Sheahan, RRT-NPS, LRT is a Licensed Respiratory Therapist at PHS and would love to hear from you if you have a tip that you’ve found helps when working with your equipment, or have an idea for a Troubleshooting Tip post. Share your tip or idea through a comment here or an email to John at jcsheahan@pediatrichomeservice.com.